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HOME Activities Dermatology

1.Research Summary

The Department of Dermatology conducts highly technical research on the structure and function of normal skin, as well as on the pathology of skin diseases.

2.Research Groups

No research groups for specific areas have been organized.

3.Research subjects

  • Genetic skin diseases
  • Gene therapy for epidermolysis bullosa
  • Beneficial biomarkers for diagnosis of SJS/TEN
  • Morphological analyses of the human touch domes

4.Research Results

[Area] Dermatology

[Research subject] Gene therapy for epidermolysis bullosa

[Description]
Genome editing with engineered site-specific endonucleases involves nonhomologous end-joining, leading to reading frame disruption. The approach is applicable to dominant negative disorders, which can be treated simply by knocking out the mutant allele, while leaving the normal allele intact. We succeeded in editing a dominant negative mutation in the COL7A1 gene in dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa using this strategy.

[Area] Dermatology

[Research subject] Beneficial biomarkers for diagnosis of SJS/TEN

[Description]
Our research subject is to identify beneficial biomarkers for diagnosis of SJS/TEN.
We have reported that granulysin and sFas ligand levels are higher in patients with early-stage SJS/TEN than those in patients with ordinary drug-induced skin reactions. Furthermore, we produced a novel immunochromatographic assay to detect high levels of serum granulysin for diagnosis. Using quantitative technique for protein analysis with a mass spectrometer, we are conductiong to detect specific and more effective biomarkers. In addition, we established a model mouse of SJS/TEN for the first time in the world. With this model, we perform further researches for clarifying mechanisms of SJS/TEN pathogenesis and discovering a therapeutic agent.

[Area] Dermatology

[Research subject] Morphological analyses of the human touch domes

[Description]
The touch dome is a mechanoreceptor in the mammalian hairy skin. The shape of the touch dome varies depending on the species. In humans, it is often difficult to identify a touch dome by its surface appearance or even by light microscopy. We previously clarified the three-dimensional structure of the human touch dome by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The touch dome was demonstrated as a concave region surrounded by thick epidermal ridge. We also revealed that the hair follicles were not necessarily accompanied by the dome. The distribution and the frequency of the human touch dome have been studied to evaluate the individual variability.

[Photographs]

Photographs

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